Dating belleek china

This list shows the type of items that were produced by Belleek and considered important at the time. Since the contemporary meaning of a. Note also with the exception of the first item which is stoneware all of them are parian and none of them. This leads to considering as to whether they are in fact of Irish origin.

This list of an early collection of Belleek contrasts with the registered designs of Belleek, the earliest of which. They relied heavily on adapting designs from other potteries. Note that the catalogue from the Museum of Practical Geology mentions these impressed marks. Nautilus Shell vase on a previous page also has a 'Belleek, Fermanagh' stamp on it. This means that it is difficult.

The registration dates for Belleek pieces have been fully researched by Brian. Russell and so there is no need to restate these here. Harp jug showing raised diamond registration mark.


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Note the blue stamp with registration date of 18 th December Care needs to be taken with these registration dates as the prevailing view is that registrated pieces were not. Date of Production stamps on Earthenware. Another indication of time is what is commonly accepted as impressed date numbers on earthenware that. The top two refer to the week of the year out of. The years and appear to have been particularly productive. It seems that this date mark was in use for only a few years. Pieces based on the design of other Potteries.

Belleek quite clearly produced items similar in design from other. Copeland cups and saucers with. Certainly it is interesting that Belleek began seriously registering their. Copeland began producing designs that were similar to the Belleek. The initial stage of trials had turned to full.

Date your Belleek

There is also a very important Belleek plate below with the usual. Belleek backstamp with the pattern number but with an impressed. It was not unusual for potteries to do this and there was a history of retailers who solely dealt with decorating. Donovan of Dublin from about until. Equally Aynsley were well known for producing blanks for other potteries such as the Glasgow potteries. This puts the recent. Regaining Time in Belleek - part 2.

This is the second part of an expanded version of a talk given in October at our meeting in Woodford. It considers how the. In light of the discussion after the talk and with others it has been expanded. The previous section set out how back stamps and other printed or impressed marks on pieces could give an. This concluding section looks at how the existing periods of. Belleek Pottery based on the logo is misleading when the timeline of the ownership of the pottery is considered. The apprentice piece mark on the earthenware platter, above. Where there are no marks.

We need to be careful of pieces which are unmarked for they can be from other potteries. When these are unmarked it is only. We should not assume an unmarked piece is. Belleek just because it looks like Belleek. Destroying information on time. One of the problems that destroys the gathering of information is when backstamps are rubbed off. However it has been suggested that if you can wash off or rub off. This is not the case.

It is suggested that all genuine marks are under. The advice is that unless you are. Misleading information that confuses retracing time in Belleek production. Earthenware was one of the first types of production at Belleek but it is not until these marks are used that. Throughout the rest of he made trials with this body. However it becomes quite confusing as he uses the. Home Books Happenings Marks. Illustrations of early Belleek backstamps in different colours.

Side Refine Panel

It appears the first colour was the true blue mark and then a red colour on parian which may refer to the yellowish glaze and high lustre glaze found on such pieces. However the red became identified with bone china and so it is not used on parian so much after the initial period of the pottery.


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The red mark does appear to be referring to the body of the piece and most pieces with this red stamp seem to have a very high lustre glaze and it may refer to this. A brown mark was also used until the black mark became standardised and it too may have been used to denote some type of production.

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Of course there is a certain overlap in the use of these stamps as we are only considering a short period of about 12 years at the most. The importance of this book is that it has a list of Belleek items acquired before this date. Given the time lag of collecting, writing and producing the book the items listed must have come from the early and mid s. The list gives a description of the items and any trademark markings.

Just before publication of this article, I had the opportunity to inspect these items in detail as it was discovered that they now mostly reside in the "study collection" at the Victoria and Albert museum, having been transferred there from the Museum of Practical Geology in Some of these items are extremely interesting and will feature in forthcoming articles. Paper Weight in form of a dragon painted red and green, shells at base; mark as 1 printed in red, and Irish character stamped.

Belleek Pottery Ltd - Official Corporate Website - The Belleek Group

This is a remarkable small paperweight, which is documented only in this catalogue and not recorded elsewhere. Cream Jug, in cream-coloured porcelain, ornamented and embossed diamond pattern, having blue bosses in centres and red bosses at the angles, with gilt leaf borders running round the neck and foot; handle in the form of a twisted cord, tinted purple; mark printed in blue. Note also with the exception of the first item which is stoneware all of them are parian and none of them are earthenware.

This leads to considering as to whether they are in fact of Irish origin whilst still accepting this is as they are described. This list of an early collection of Belleek contrasts with the registered designs of Belleek, the earliest of which were registered in September Now that the whereabouts of these pieces has been discovered, we will be able to research them in more detail. The Nautilus Shell vase on a previous page also has a 'Belleek, Fermanagh' stamp on it. These two impressed stamps were used frequently throughout the first period and not just in the s.

This means that it is difficult to ascribe any particular time to a piece with this mark by itself, apart from the fact that many early pieces have this alone or in conjunction with the normal printed mark. Registration Marks The registration dates for Belleek pieces have been fully researched by Brian Russell and so there is no need to restate these here. Date of Production stamps on Earthenware Another indication of time is what is commonly accepted as impressed date numbers on earthenware that appear as two numbers above a line with two numbers below.

The top two refer to the week of the year out of 52 and the bottom two refer to the year. The years and appear to have been particularly productive as many pieces have numbers for these years. Certainly it is interesting that Belleek began seriously registering their designs in September more rigorously around the time that Copeland began producing designs that were similar to the Belleek 'Grass' pattern in The initial stage of trials had turned to full production and they needed to protect their production by then.

This shows how Belleek were quite willing to use products from other potteries to supplement their own production. It was not unusual for potteries to do this and there was a history of retailers who solely dealt with decorating ceramics from various potteries from the late eighteenth century.

The efficient railways and other forms of transport were able to move these around the country. This puts the recent connection between Belleek and Aynsley into an historical connection that goes back to the earliest production.

Belleek Basket Marks

In light of the discussion after the talk and with others it has been expanded to consider relevant areas, which were not considered at the time as the talk was more related to parian production. The previous section set out how back stamps and other printed or impressed marks on pieces could give an indication of what was happening at the pottery. This concluding section looks at how the existing periods of Belleek Pottery based on the logo is misleading when the timeline of the ownership of the pottery is considered.

Where there are no marks We need to be careful of pieces which are unmarked for they can be from other potteries. The Coalisland pottery is well known for producing pieces which are copies from Belleek. When these are unmarked it is only the standard of quality that can guide us but this is not infallible. However one explanation given was that a green mark was less noticeable looking at it from the inside of a Belleek piece!